Benjamin Felix

MBA, CFA, CFP, Portfolio Manager

Born and raised on Vancouver Island, BC, Benjamin completed a degree in mechanical engineering before pursuing a career in financial services via the MBA program at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business.
Born and raised on Vancouver Island, BC, Benjamin completed a degree in mechanical engineering before pursuing a career in financial services via the MBA program at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business.
Advanced Investing

The Irrelevance of Dividends: Still a Non-Starter

Most of the arguments from dividend lovers boil down to being able to successfully select individual stocks. This is not something most people can do consistently. Even in a supposed stock-picking environment, there is no reason to believe that dividends, or the growth of dividends, would be an indication of a good stock to own.

Personal Wealth

The Rational Reminder Podcast Episode 61: Ted Seides: Much More Than a Betting Man

You might know Ted Seides from his famous bet with Warren Buffett or, more recently, from his widely successful Capital Allocators Podcast. Ted is what we would call a classically impressive guy, having studied at both Ivy League frontrunners Yale and Harvard and having founded Protégé Partners, an asset management and advisory firm that specializes in hedge funds.

Business Wealth

Reconsidering REITs in Your Investment Portfolio

You may not realize it, but if you’re a Common Sense Investing fan, you probably already invest in real estate. For example, the iShares Core S&P/TSX Capped Composite Index ETF (XIC) includes a 3.44% allocation to real estate. The iShares Core S&P U.S. Total Market Index ETF (ITOT) has a 3.89% allocation, and the iShares Core MSCI EAFE IMI Index (XEF) has 5.06%.

Advanced Investing

The Rational Reminder Podcast Episode 58: The Ins and Outs of Real Estate: Mortgage Rate, Rentals, REITs and Variable Annuities

Benjamin and Cameron are talking real estate, specifically mortgage rates and REITs. For the first time since the early 90s, fixed mortgage rates are lower than variable ones, which have always been the popular choice. However, due to the fact that Canada’s yield curve is inverted,  short term rates higher than their long-term counterparts.