Starting Out

The Rational Reminder Podcast Episode 112: Michael Kitces on Retirement Research and the Business of Financial Advice

Michael weighs in on three approaches to variable spending, why people can do what they love and still retire well, and his research on the ‘rising equity glidepath’. He also speaks about why it’s normal to start saving after you hit forty, and why withdrawal policy statements can help you have a better idea of when your portfolio is in the red.

Starting Out

The Rational Reminder Podcast Episode 99: Andrew Hallam (Millionaire Teacher): How to be Wealthy (and Happy)

We often talk about better planning, reduced spending and a consistent long-term strategy on the show and today we have a guest who not only gives that advice himself but clearly lives it too! Andrew Hallam is the author of the new book Millionaire Expat in which he details some strategies for what has been called geographic arbitrage, or moving to another part of the world in order to maximize your financial independence!

Starting Out

The Rational Reminder Podcast 94: The Stock Market vs. The Economy, and Assessing Risk Tolerance

When it comes to the question of whether the economy affects the stock market, it’s not about whether the former is in a good or bad state, but how that relates to what the market was expecting. In today’s episode we get into predictions about labour economics during COVID-19, the relationship between the market and the economy, and how to make decisions that suit your risk tolerance.

Starting Out

Is Investing Risky? Yes … and No

One of the most common perceptions about investing is that it is risky. This is easy to state, but harder to defend when you get into the details. To decide whether or not investing is risky, we first need to think about what “risk” is. Depending on what you are investing in – and what you are investing for – there are different ways to think about and measure risk.

Starting Out

Are You Ready for a Recession?

It has been more than a decade since the last U.S. recession. Prior to that, the longest gap between recessions was exactly a decade. Moreover, when I started drafting this post and its related video, the U.S. yield curve had briefly inverted, which means longer-term bond rates were lower than shorter-term bond rates. Besides this being a bit Alice-in-Wonderland-like, inverted yield curves also have been good predictors of coming U.S. recessions.