Starting Out

What’s a Normal Stock Return?

Here’s are two trick questions: Are you normal? Am I normal? Common sense tells us it’s impossible to answer either without also asking: Compared to what? For example, check out this image of the Passmore & Felix team on our newly updated website.

Market Research
Solar Panel Solar Farm by zbynek burival on unsplash

How rigorous is ESG research?

In my previous blog post, I talked about Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) investing, why investors are interested and the different ways to implement it in your portfolio. This naturally raises the next question: how rigorous is the ESG research and does it actually differentiate and reward good from bad behavior?

Starting Out
Peace Sign Finger Up by patrick fore on unsplash

Passive Investing in 2 Numbers

There are some serious misconceptions about active management and index investing which I’d like to walk through with you today. I’m going to hit you with two really staggering numbers about the US stock market, then explain what each of these data points imply for active and passive investors.

Starting Out
Students Studying Together Desk Drinking Coffee

5 Ways to Pay for Post-Secondary Education

If you’re looking to fund your own or your child’s education but haven’t regularly saved for several years towards those expenses, there are a number of options for paying for expensive tuition, housing and textbook costs. In today’s post, I’ll outline the 5 ways you can pay for education costs or put away short-term savings for it.

Starting Out
Graduation Day Throwing Hat by vasily koloda on unsplash

Student Loan Debt Repayment Case

In this episode of Your Money, Your Choices, Susan uses a concrete example of a new graduate paying off student and car loans to show how small differences in your debt repayment strategy can add up over time and save you interest costs and reduce the time it takes to pay off debts.

Starting Out
Mother Daughter Counting Money Coins Piggy Bank

How to Build an Emergency Fund

Financial planners and advisors across Canada suggest you should save 3 to 6 months worth of expenses in an emergency fund. You’ve figured out how much you are aiming for, using some of the guidelines from my last video perhaps.